Friday, February 14, 2020

Saying ‘Thank you’ to Cookie Customers


Saying ‘Thank you’ to Cookie Customers

There's more to Girl Scout Cookies than what is in the cookie package! When your Girl Scout sells Girl Scout Cookies, they’re learning skills which can be used in business and in everyday life. Whether she is interacting with past customers or new ones, make sure she practices good customer service! For example, when a Girl Scout says “thank you” to her cookie customers, she is learning about business ethics, communication skills, and how to be professional and polite. Saying thank you is so important! By saying thank you, you show how much you value them helping you reach your goals.


Here are some unique ways that our Girl Scouts say thank you to their cookie customers.



Sarah from troop 2232 and Emily from troop 2531 show their neighbors, family, and friends that they appreciate their support during cookie season by placing fulfilled orders in a hand crafted paper bag that includes a thank you note and a business card. The note includes a copy of the original order. This reminds customers what was purchased, how much money is owed, and tells them how to order more cookies if they’re looking for one more box...or case of Girl Scout Cookies. 




What better way for GSNC’s Robotics teams to say “thank you” than with the robot that they designed and built? These Girl Scouts put thank you stickers on the cookie packages and presented the boxes using their robot. Cool, right?


Troop 1335 says thank you to their cookie customers by making and giving out SWAPS (Special Whatchamacallits Affectionately Pinned Somewhere). Check out this glass of milk SWAP, which of course, pairs perfectly with Girl Scout Cookies.

And of course, you can always say thank you by spelling out a big “THANK YOU” using packages of Girl Scout Cookies, just like London, a Girl Scout Daisy from troop 3217. You can then take a picture of your message and share it with all of your Cookie Customers via email or social media.




How do you say “thank you” to your cookie customers? Share with us on Facebook and Instagram.

To find Girl Scout Cookies near you, use our Cookie Finder App.


Friday, February 7, 2020

Once a Girl Scout, Always a Girl Scout: Dienamarie’s Story

Who are Girl Scouts? Girl Scouts are Go-getters, Innovators, Risk-takers, and Leaders. They’re girls who design robots, learn life skills, improve our neighborhoods, and go on amazing adventures. They’re making a difference.


Girl Scouts is a lifelong adventure full of friendship, connection, service, and fun! Every Girl Scout has a unique story to tell, and we’re sharing those stories.


Girl Scout Lifetime Member, Dienamarie was a Girl Scout for 12 years and has been volunteering with Girl Scouts of Nassau County in a variety of ways for 17 years. Currently, she is a troop leader in the Merrick Service Unit and she mentors Girl Scouts in our council who are working toward earning their Girl Scout Gold Award.


Name: Dienamarie G.

Council: Girl Scouts of Nassau County



Tell us about your time as a Girl Scout. Looking back, what were some highlights, important moments, life lessons, and/or favorite memories?

Girl Scouts has given me a well-rounded experience from the beginning. I attribute that to my leaders and the program that I was given. It allowed us to explore and grow in a variety of ways, trying things that were new. Girl Scouts, from what I remember, started at a young age when your leaders took the lead and that was alright. They were constantly encouraging us to take the lead and by the time we had gotten older, we did take leadership roles.


I loved becoming a Girl Scout Brownie and the ceremony that went with it (we had a real mirror and fake but pretty flowers around).


I also have a million memories from a trip my troop took in my Senior year of Girl Scouts. We went to Disney World in Florida and wore our full Girl Scout uniform on the airplane both ways, and had the time of our lives!      



Did you earn your Girl Scout Gold Award (or the First Class, Curved Bar Award, or Golden Eagle)? If so, tell us about your project, what year you earned it and how working toward earning this higher award impacted you.

Yes, I earned the Girl Scout Gold Award. I was able to do a series of workshops with sixth grade girls who were entering middle school that next year. I focused on self-confidence, self-esteem, courage to be oneself, leadership, etiquette, positive self as a teenager, and glamour. I was able to work with the girls on each of these things through fun and interactive activities and discussions. When earning my Girl Scout Gold Award, I developed the leadership skills and the courage to take on anything and everything that life throws at me. I was able to take on so much more in college and in life because I had already led a project and seen it successfully completed. 



Did Girl Scouts have an impact on your career choice/field of study? If so, how?

At first, I studied fashion design to build my skills artistically and professionally. I love fashion and it has impacted my life. Girl Scouts helped me focus on the path and lead the way for others to follow. I went on to study art education, knowing my reach would be bigger. I am now the Art Teacher for an elementary school where I am able to instill leadership and courage into each of my students. 



Do you continue to volunteer with Girl Scouts? If so, how and why?

Yes, I absolutely continue to volunteer with Girl Scouts, supporting girls the same way I was supported when I was a girl; helping them build the courage, confidence, and character to be the leaders that they already are. My mother and I volunteer as two of the leaders for a multi-level Girl Scout troop of Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors. I also volunteer as a Girl Scout Gold Award Mentor for girls wanting to be Gold Award Girl Scouts. 



What advice would you give younger Girl Scouts?

Stay with Girl Scouts! Find your way and your will through the leadership and courage Girl Scouts provides. Girl Scouts not only provides outdoor experiences, but the inner experience and life lessons that we all need. We all need to be women of courage, confidence, and character; we all need to be Go-Getters.



If you could say anything to your younger self, what would be?

If I could say something to my younger self, it would be tolive with courage and leadership. Let your talents shine and help others along the way. Being a Girl Scout will set you on the path.



What is one item you always carry with you?

I always carry my Girl Scout pin and Girl Scout Gold Award pin. 



Tell us a little about yourself. How long were you a Girl Scout? Did you participate in any special Girl Scout groups and/or school teams/clubs? What are you passionate about?

I have been a Girl Scout since I was five years old. All the qualities of a Girl Scout are a part of who I am. I love being involved in Girl Scouts, volunteering and giving back. It sets a fire in you to see the older girls flourish and grow into the leaders they already are.


I’m also a Stage Four Breast Cancer Thriver and live on being brave and fearless. I have been thriving since 2015 and will for a long time- I will live.  It is a part of my life and I will face it with courage, character, and confidence that I will succeed in healing completely.  Healing is what we all want and can achieve. I am working towards being completely healed and multi-tasking life, because life is for living.

Friday, January 31, 2020

Different Ways to "Bling Your Booth" and Stay Within Your Booth Sale Location’s Guidelines

Different Ways to "Bling Your Booth" and Stay Within Your Booth Sale Location’s Guidelines

Today (January 31, 2020) is the official start of Girl Scout Cookie Booth Sales here in Nassau County! One of the fun things for your Girl Scouts to do during booth sale season is to “Bling your Booth.” But, how can you “Bling Your Booth” when your booth sale location has guidelines. Try some of these ideas:


Girl Scouts can set up the cookie packages and cases in a fun, decorative way. 


Have each of the Girl Scouts in your troop come up with a unique "elevator" pitch. Then let the girls take turns trying out their “elevator” pitch on customers. This gives each girl the opportunity to practice their marketing and people skills while at the booth sale. 


Make sure their vests/sashes are Girl Scout Cookie Season ready. The GSNC Shop even has a patch for that! When you go into the GSNC Shop for a uniform checkup, you will receive a free patch with your checkup and a $5 purchase!)



Get creative with unique Operation Cookie and Troop Gift of Caring donation containers.

 
Borrow Girl Scout Cookie costumes from the Volunteer Resource Center


As a troop activity, work with the girls to come up with some apparel or accessory Cookie Creations—Headbands, hair ties, necklaces, drawstring backpacks, or maybe even a T-shirt to wear under her vest/sash. As an added bonus, some of these activities can be used to earn badges like the Sewing badge and Jeweler badge. (No time to make it? Check out the GSNC Shop for Girl Scout Cookie apparel and accessories.)


Gather some paper and markers, and have your troop make handmade thank you cards to give out with every Girl Scout Cookie purchase. The words “thank you” can go a long way. 




Group some of the Girl Scout Cookie packages together into bundles.



Looking for Girl Scout Cookies? Find a Girl Scout Cookie booth sale using our Cookie Finder app



Friday, January 10, 2020

Once a Girl Scout, Always a Girl Scout: Girl Scout Alum Raven's Story


Who are Girl Scouts? Girl Scouts are go-getters, innovators, risk-takers and leaders. They’re G.I.R.L.S who design robots, learn life skills, improve our neighborhoods and go on amazing adventures. They’re making a difference.
Girl Scouts is a lifelong adventure full of friendship, connection, service, and fun! Every Girl Scout Alum has a unique story to tell about her experiences and adventures, and we’re sharing those stories.
Girl Scout Alum Raven was a Girl Scout for 7 years and continues to volunteer with Girl Scouts of Nassau County in a variety of ways. 
Name: Raven Brewington
Council: Girl Scouts of Nassau County


Tell us about your time as a Girl Scout. Looking back, what were some highlights, important moments, life lessons, and/or favorite memories?
To say Girl Scouts changed my life is an understatement. My fondest memories revolve around Camp Blue Bay. I can remember the songs, campfires, swimming and crafts, not to mention all of the friendships I gained. I was able to blossom into the outgoing young woman I am today. Eventually my friends and fellow Girl Scouts from my troop would join me summer after summer to make memories we would enjoy for a lifetime.

Did Girl Scouts have an impact on your career choice/field of study? If so, how?
While Girl Scouts did not directly impact my career choice, it instilled in me the dedication to give back and inspire young women. I have consistently mentored and volunteered with Girl Scouts as an adult. From coaching softball during college in Philadelphia to volunteering at PRETTY GIRLS SWEAT where I encouraged young women and girls to live active and healthy lifestyles. Eventually I became a Troop Leader in my hometown of Elmont after graduating with my Bachelor of Science degree from Temple University.                      
What Girl Scout skills have you used in your college/professional life?
I can always thank Girl Scouts for teaching me skills I needed to be successful in any endeavor. The importance and knack for networking, communication, and entrepreneurship were not things I knew I was gaining through my time as a Girl Scout. From the badges, trips, and various activities we engaged in, I unknowingly learned things that ultimately shaped my values and the way I carry myself. I am more confident, adventurous, inquisitive, and independent because of Girl Scouts; being a leader wherever I am has become natural to me and I have Girl Scouts to thank for that.

Do you continue to volunteer with Girl Scouts? If so, how and why?
I continue to be a Troop Leader in Elmont, Delegate Chair for the Elmont Service Unit and National Delegate for Girl Scouts of Nassau County because I value the mission, vision and values of Girl Scouts. I am proud to be a part of an organization that builds up women and girls. I have been able to create my own event partnering GSNC and PRETTY GIRLS SWEAT. The Annual Girl Scout Fitness Party is a one of a kind experience to inspire and motivate young women and girls to improve the world by developing leadership skills through wellness. Recently I represented the United States at the Sangam World Centre for the 2019 Juliette Low Seminar. We had the opportunity to #LeadOutLoud and learn about leadership mindsets and the 5th Sustainable Development Goal, Gender Equality. The Sustainable Development Goals are a collection of 17 global goals designed to be a "blueprint to achieve a better and more sustainable future for all."

What advice would you give younger Girl Scouts?
I will always encourage younger Girl Scouts to be brave and try new things. We all have the strength inside of us to overcome our fears and be the best at whatever we put our mind to. Girl Scouts helped me realize if I wasn’t brave enough to try new things, I would not get to where I wanted to be.

If you could say anything to your younger self, what would it be?
You are smart, you are beautiful, and you have a brighter future than you can see right now. It is okay to not know all the answers, love your differences, and embrace change. I am happy that through life experiences I was able to understand these things, however, being able to hear them at an earlier age may have impacted my outlook on life as well.

What is one item you always carry with you?
I am very sentimental so I always have 3 pieces of jewelry on me at all times. A ring from my god-mother who always told me to be true to myself. A bracelet from my grandmother who constantly put others before herself and showed me that being selfless will get you further in life than being selfish ever could. And last, I always wear my necklace gifted to me by my mother. She is my number one fan and my support system. Having them with me at all times gives me the support I need to conquer any obstacle and get me through any situation I may face.

Tell us a little about yourself. How long were you a Girl Scout? Did you participate in any special Girl Scout groups and/or school teams/clubs? What are you passionate about?
I joined as a Daisy and continued until the Cadette level, totally 7 years as a Girl Member. I was heavily involved in activities in high school from band, National Honor Society, National Art Honor Society, National Foreign Language Honor Society, Key Club and being a captain of the varsity softball team throughout High School. While I never received any of the Girl Scout Higher Awards, I am most proud of continuing as an Adult Member and keeping my promise to become a Lifetime Member
After graduating college, I continued my passion for health and wellness. I worked at a premier fitness gym prior to entering my career in healthcare at Weill Cornell Medicine and eventually acquiring my Master of Health Administration at Hofstra University. I am excited to continue volunteering in my community and mentoring young women.


Friday, December 20, 2019

A Holiday Message from Girl Scouts of Nassau County (GSNC)



During this season, we take time to reflect upon the good things we have,
like our Girl Scouts, volunteers, families, and community partners.

We hope your holidays will be filled with
joy and laughter through the New Year.

Happy Holidays
from your friends at
Girl Scouts of Nassau County! 





We’re the Girl Scouts of Nassau County: We’re 23, 000 strong – more than 16,900 girls and 5,100 adults who believe in the power of every G.I.R.L. (Go-getter, Innovator, Risk-taker, Leader)™  from Nassau County to change the world. Our extraordinary journey began more than 100 years ago with the original G.I.R.L., Juliette Gordon “Daisy” Low. On March 12, 1912, in Savannah, Georgia, she organized the very first Girl Scout Troop, and every year since we’ve honored her vision and legacy, building girls of courage, confidence, and character who make the world a better place. We’re the preeminent leadership development organization for girls.  And with programs in Nassau County, across Long Island and throughout the United States and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure, and success. 
To volunteer, reconnect, donate or join, visit www.gsnc.org.

Friday, December 13, 2019

Once a Girl Scout, Always a Girl Scout: Girl Scout Alum Bonnie's Story

Who are Girl Scouts? Girl Scouts are go-getters, innovators, risk-takers and leaders. They’re G.I.R.L.S who design robots, learn life skills, improve our neighborhoods and go on amazing adventures. They’re making a difference.


Girl Scouts is a lifelong adventure full of friendship, connection, service, and fun! Every Girl Scout Alum has a unique story to tell about their experiences and adventures, and we’re sharing those stories.


Girl Scout Alum Bonnie was a Girl Scout for 8 years and continues to volunteer with Girl Scouts of Nassau County in a variety of ways. As a Gold Award Mentor, she guides Girl Scout Seniors and Ambassadors as they work toward the highest award a Girl Scout can earn, the Girl Scout Gold Award.


Name: Bonnie Parente

Council: Girl Scouts of Nassau County



Tell us about your time as a Girl Scout. Looking back, what were some highlights, important moments, life lessons, and/or favorite memories:



If I had to pick a memory that stands out, it would be difficult, so here are my top three: (1) fishing off the pier at the Port Washington Town Dock, (2) walking through Manhattan using the “buddy system” and (3) getting lost in the corn maze at Camp Tekakwitha in Suffolk County. 



About 45 years ago, I started Girl Scouts as one of the original Tag-Alongs. I was in kindergarten and my mom started a Girl Scout Brownie troop for my older sister Patti. This was even before Girl Scout Daisies existed. I was included in the troop by default. My mom always did a great job of keeping a multi-grade troop so she could do things with both of us.



My mom let us put tents up in the backyard when we were too young to go camping, but she didn’t skimp out on planning. We still had to pack correctly, wear bandanas on our heads to prevent ticks, and we learned how to prepare a bed roll so that everything you needed was rolled into your sleeping bag. Eventually, we camped at Camp Blue Bay and Camp Tekakwitha.



Years later, when looking for the right confirmation name as I was getting ready for confirmation at Corpus Christi Church in Mineola, I was given a book of saints by my Grandmother Mary Santosus (my dad’s mom). The first Native American saint had just recently been canonized and her name was Kateri Tekakwitha! In that moment, I chose Tekakwitha as my confirmation name. It tied in so many important parts of my life, including my life as a Girl Scout. Just recently, a very special person in my life gifted me a statue of St. Tekakwitha. To think it all started for me in a corn maze and now she’s with me everywhere. A great reminder of my time in Girl Scouts.



My mom was the greatest Girl Scout leader!! She took us to Manhattan for shows at a time when most moms would have been nervous to take 25 girls on a train and subway into New York City. To this day, my friends’ moms tell me how much they appreciated how much my mom did to expose their daughters to new adventures, and to show them they could do anything. No trip was too big for our troop. We visited Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and the Statue of Liberty. These trips are daunting to plan for some people today, and my mom did it before cell phones and the internet. When looking back at this, I realize that my mom, just by doing these things, taught me that I could do anything I wanted to do. As a leader, she showed patience, organization, planning, and many other skills.



These memories are what I wanted for my children and so, I became a Girl Scout and a Boy Scout leader for my daughter and son. I only hoped that I could do even a fraction of what my leader/mom did for me.



If I had to pick out a memory that stands out, it would be difficult, so let me do my top three: (1) fishing off the pier at the Port Washington Town Dock, (2) walking through Manhattan using the “buddy system” and (3) getting lost in the corn maze at Camp Tekakwitha in Suffolk County. 





Did Girl Scouts have an impact on your career choice/field of study? If so, how?

I still remember that my leader opened every single meeting with the Pledge of Allegiance and the Girl Scout Promise. We ended each meeting with a song, some of which I still hum along to today. This appreciation for meetings and how things get accomplished has stayed with me and I credit my years in Girl Scouts for bringing me to my current position as Mayor of East Williston.



My one regret might have been that I did not go for the Girl Scout Gold Award. I don’t think it was talked about much in my community at the time, but if I had one piece of advice for a younger Girl Scout, go for Gold and don’t do anything small just to check it off a list. Do everything bigger than it needs to be. 



Do you have advice for younger Girl Scouts?

Yes, wear your uniform proudly! This goes for the leader too. As a leader, I always wore a green sweater (later navy) and a Girl Scout scarf. Before I had the scarf, I always had on my pin tab. If we can’t show our colors proudly, how can we expect our children too? I’ve noticed over the years that the kids who tuck in their little league shirts and always wear their full uniform or vest (with all necessary accessories) are prouder and more serious about what they’re doing. It even may lead to proudly wearing a uniform in the future (military, fire, police, doctor scrubs. . .). When you do something, do it full on!



Why do you continue to volunteer with Girl Scouts?

In my volunteer position as Gold Award mentor, I have been given two wonderful opportunities. One is to work with young women from all areas of Nassau County and the other is to work with some incredible adults. As a mentor, I have been able to work with young women who have grown up in different environments, with varying skills and obstacles, and they all have one thing in common—Girl Scouting! The girls all find a way to take the foundation they’ve received in life, the gifts they were given, and the challenges they’ve faced, all to achieve one common goal of the highest award in Girl Scouts. My eyes were opened in many ways by these young women.



The other opportunity that I’ve had is to work with women with diverse gifts, skills, backgrounds, and challenges that are seen throughout the landscape of the Girl Scouts. And despite the diversity, there is always one common ground… wanting to give back by mentoring young women. I’m in awe of the young women I’ve met and in even greater awe of the women I’ve met and worked with. I feel very blessed to be a Gold Award Mentor with the Girl Scouts of Nassau County.

If were a Girl Scout and would like to join Girl Scouts of Nassau County's Girl Scout Alum Network, email us at gsnetwork@gsnc.org.

Friday, December 6, 2019

What an AWSM Opportunity



Did you know that Girls in 10th and 11th grades have the opportunity to apply for a summer internship at the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research in partnership with Advancing Women in Science and Medicine (AWSM)? Those picked for this program work side by side under the mentorship of AWSM Faculty and research a topic of their choice. Hear firsthand from Girl Scout Katie G. as she shares about her experience. 



How did you hear about this opportunity?
I had originally known only about the regular Feinstein high school internship program, and had no idea a specialized GirlScout opportunity existed until a friend of the family—who happens to be a troop leader—told me about it over summer break. She knew I loved research and thought it would give me a chance to take part in it on a professional level.


How did you get to be a part of this program?
First, my mom and I attended the open house and information session in October to find out more about the program. After what I knew I definitely wanted to apply, so I accessed the online application and began the process of filling it out. Any questions I had were quickly answered by either the Girl Scouts or Feinstein staff!



What research topic did you work on? 
I researched red blood cells, particularly their development from hematopoietic stem cells into mature red cells, and how disrupting this process affects the cell cycle as well as the growth late. Research is fluid, and ever-changing, so there is always another variable to be explored.



Why did you choose this one?
My own personal research delves into looking at biology from a computational standpoint. I felt that this could be applied to red cell research, particularly in the growth plate where there is a lot of movement that has the potential to be modelled and analyzed. The red cell field seemed less defined than others, as red cells are so inherently unique, and I wanted to be a part of this emerging research, and learn about these principles of biology.



Who did you get to work with?
I worked with an MD/PhD student from Hofstra named Elena Brindley. In the lab there were other PhD candidates all working under Dr. Blanc. Additionally, the lab works with the clinical side of anemia research, as the diamond blackfan anemia registry is in an adjacent office.


What did a typical day look like?
I would arrive anywhere from 9:00-10:00 and begin to work. My work depended on what part of the procedure I was doing, but I would often use machinery like the Western blot imager or microscope. I would have lunch at around 12:00, and over lunch I would occasionally attend educational seminars highlighting other medical research. After I was done for the day, usually between 3:30 and 5:30, I would go home.




What are some skills you gained from this experience?
I gained essential skills and learned many new things, refining my science and math skills. I became what can be called “lab-literate”, understanding how to conduct professional grade research, follow detailed procedure, and learning how to analyze and interpret results to draw conclusions and new hypotheses.



How do you plan to use these skills in the future?
These skills are essential considering I plan on pursuing math and science as a career. I intend to major in physics and computer science, and being able to work in a lab, having this real-life experience, gives me a huge advantage.



What advice do you have for a younger girl who might be interested in the STEM fields?
My advice for girls interested in STEM is that you must be confident in your abilities. Never

be discouraged if someone tells you that “it’s too difficult”, or implies that because you are a girl certain fields are too hard for you. That is absolutely wrong‑You have the power to do anything you believe you can do so set your expectations high. If you remain confident in your success, other people will be confident in you as well. Today, there is much less stigma against girls in science, but there remains an enormous gap between the number of men and women pursuing careers in STEM, particularly the applied sciences and engineering. Become a role model for future generations of young women so that they do not think twice about going into STEM, and remember that you are just as capable of succeeding as anyone else.